CAMPBELL RIVER
SUMMER OF 2010
CAMPBELL RIVER
SUMMER OF 2009
CHEMAINUS
THE LITTLE TOWN
THAT DID
THE ORCA WHALE... Also known as the Killer
Whale are abundant in the BC Coastal waters and
can often be spotted from the shore from many
waterside communities up and down the coast. In this
area there are 2 different species of Killer Whale...
the Resident Killer Whales and the Transient Killer
Whales and, while looking similar to the untrained
eye they have very distinctly different living habits...
the most outstanding is their eating habits... with the
Residents having a diet of mainly fish and the
Transients having a diet that consists of sea
mammals, including seals, dolphins and other whales.

The Residents are a highly socialised group, staying
together in pods, vocalising to each other especially
when hunting their food. Unlike marine mammals, fish
cannot hear the vocalising of the Killer Whale. The
Transients use stealth to hunt their prey and the
dolphins... prey of the Transients ... stay well clear of
them .. but will show no fear of the Resident Whales.

The following information was taken from Wikipedia

Resident: These are the most commonly sighted of
the three populations in the coastal waters of the
northeast Pacific. Residents' diet consists primarily
of fish and sometimes squid, and they live in complex
and cohesive family groups called pods. Female
residents characteristically have a rounded dorsal fin
tip that terminates in a sharp corner. They visit the
same areas consistently. British Columbia and
Washington resident populations are amongst the
most-intensively studied marine mammals.
Researchers have identified and named over 300
killer whales over the past 30 years.


Transient: The diet of these whales consists almost
exclusively of marine mammals; they do not eat fish.
Transients generally travel in small groups, usually of
two to six animals, and have less persistent family
bonds than residents. Transients vocalize in less
variable and less complex dialects. Female
transients are characterized by more triangular and
pointed dorsal fins than those of residents.[19] The
gray or white area around the dorsal fin, known as the
"saddle patch", often contains some black colouring
in residents. However, the saddle patches of
transients are solid and uniformly gray. Transients
roam widely along the coast; some individuals have
been sighted in both southern Alaska and California.
If you have questions or comments about the website please email Alan Clarke at:  info@gypsyy.com
.
CAMPBELL RIVER
VANCOUVER ISLAND
CAMPBELL RIVER
VANCOUVER ISLAND
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